Mac external displays for designers and developers – Part 1

Mac external displays for designers and developers – Part 1

Ini adalah artikel bahagian satu yang menarik berkaitan fakta berguna untuk pemilihan bagi paparan luaran ( external display ) untuk produk Mac daripada Apple.

If you’re considering an external display for your Mac, there’s a few important decisions to make. Apple doesn’t sell external displays any more, so you can’t just default to their wisdom. That’s an issue, because not all displays are well suited for Macs.

April 2022 update: Mac external displays for designers and developers, part 2 contains newer information, and includes Apple’s Pro Display XDR and Studio Display.

If you’re considering an external display for your Mac, there’s a few important decisions to make. Apple doesn’t sell external displays any more, so you can’t just default to their wisdom. That’s an issue, because not all displays are well suited for Macs.

April 2022 update: Mac external displays for designers and developers, part 2 contains newer information, and includes Apple’s Pro Display XDR and Studio Display.

Which size?

I can’t really help you with this one. It’ll likely be set by your budget, desk space and personal preference. The factors below will play a role, too.

Retina or non-Retina?

Thunderbolt 2 and DisplayPort 1.2 have a maximum resolution of 3840×2160 at 60FPS, which means non-Retina resolutions up to about 40-inch are supported by most current Macs. But, that only covers Retina displays up to 20-inch. Thunderbolt 3 equiped Macs, like the 2016 MacBook Pros, can run 27-inch Retina displays though.

There is another issue to contend with. Apple’s interface design in macOS is set up so it is comfortable for most people at a density of about 110 pixels per inch for non-Retina, and about 220 pixels per inch for Retina — text is readable and button targets are easy to hit at a normal viewing distance. Using a display that isn’t close to 110PPI or 220PPI means text and interface elements will either be too big, or too small.

The Display pane in System Preferences includes “larger text” and “more space” options. These can be used as a solution, but if you do, macOS will render the entire screen to a virtual canvas, then bitmap scale it up or down to the desired size. The result is blurry pixels, higher memory usage, more work for the GPU to do, and shorter battery life for laptops. You want to use the “default for this display” setting, if you can. It’s better quality, faster, and gives longer battery life.

Blurry pixels and a scaled display make it very difficult for designers and developers to see if elements are where they need to be. Elements that animate will appear to shimmer as they move. For me, “default for this display” is the only way to go.

Sila baca artikel penuh melalui : https://bjango.com/articles/macexternaldisplays/

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